Posts in Blog
Over 2,000 people donated to my Facebook fundraiser following the Tree of Life shooting

By Monica Edelman

I don’t know the race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability, or personal history of the vast majority of my fundraiser’s donors. In this digital age, for me they are generous little circular profile pictures alerting me of a new donation every thirty seconds. For two days I watched their faces flash and flash, over and over, continually curating new donations on the screen of my cell phone in what was a beautiful slideshow of names, both familiar and foreign, giving what they could to help out complete strangers.

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Why you should absolutely, definitely, avoid the Young Women's Leadership Conference at all costs.

By Susanna Lustbader

Don’t ask me to abandon my bed on a chilly afternoon in early December. After all, I have an appointment with my pillows to hole up with mac & cheese and binge watch an entire season of The Office. Why would I want to surrender my well-broken-in sweatpants for casual office attire, my day of splendid vegetation for a Young Women’s Leadership Conference? 

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The Choice

By Nancy C. Snowden

How should we move forward in a world that feels like it is ripping at the seams and actively seems to be working to stop us—and the Jewish community we are a part of—from being exactly who we are, Jewish. We mustn’t give in to hate, and we must continue to love each other, our neighbors and the world. Hate must not win.

Today, and every day, while I am always Nancy, I am most certainly also Binah, my Hebrew name. I am Jewish and I am unrelenting. While I am afraid, I will not let that fear change who I am.

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Love Thy Transgender Neighbor

By Idalia Friedson

We were a sight to behold:  six Jews and two Hindus standing shoulder to shoulder on the synagogue bimah (stage) , smiling and teary-eyed as we watched “Abe” receive a new Hebrew name, an important part of his Jewish identity. He  beamed as the Rabbi blessed him and gave him the new name, one that he could now use as a transgender man.

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Mayonnaise Sandwiches

By Nancy C. Snowden

The young boy I was sitting next to unzipped his shiny red vinyl lunchbox and pulled out a massive homemade Rice Krispies® Treat covered in plastic wrap. I unrolled my brown paper bag and pulled out a sandwich. I opened it up and found nothing inside but mayonnaise. I looked over at his snack longingly…

This was how I became aware that some people in the world have a lot, and some people do not.

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How our Women to Watch have seen women's leadership evolve

We asked our former Women to Watch honorees how they’ve seen women’s leadership change over the last decade, and their responses show us how far we’ve come together. There’s still so much work to be done, but by recognizing the incredible women in our community, we’ve marked and honored the legacy of women who came before us.

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On the Blasey Ford testimony

As we watch Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testify before the Senate committee, we need no further confirmation of the of the life-altering trauma that she has suffered and survived at the hands of Brett Kavanaugh, and we are outraged on her behalf. 

Yet the actions and statements made by some of our political leaders have moved us back in time – back to a time when sexual assault and domestic violence survivors were silenced and incidents where men take advantage of women were swept under the rug.

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How do we define feminism? A discussion of The Female Persuasion

By Jaclyn Margolis

I’ve heard the word feminism defined in many ways over the years, and I admitted to our group that I found the descriptions of feminism in The Female Persuasion very intriguing. I asked the group how they defined feminism and if they agreed with the delineations in the book, and, this question spurred such a strong and deep dialogue on the meaning of feminism.

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The Breakfast Club

By Nancy C. Snowden

I am often asked why I work for a fraternity and what I as a woman could possibly glean, let alone benefit from, in this role. While I could provide numerous examples of what working for a fraternity has taught me, what I have learned about the desperate need for more resources and transparency around men, masculinity, and mental health often takes my breath away.  

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Bringing open-heartedness into 5779

By Lori Weinstein

This time of year directs us to turn ourselves inside out, make amends, begin anew – with a fresh gaze and an open heart – all in our life journey to do better and be better. Open-heartedness is the journey of forgiveness. It is spacious and rejuvenating. It enables you to return to your daily battles with renewed vigor, commitment and optimism.

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Hear Us Vote: 25 women tell us why they're voting this November.

By Sasha Altschuler

With 67 days until the midterm elections, voting is on my mind. A vote is more than helping shape the future, it's about acknowledging and honoring the past. We are responsible for continuing the legacy of the women who fought for our right to vote; we owe it to our communities to act as a catalyst for change by taking our voices to the polls.

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Tonight, on Bachelor in Paradise: Gaslighting in action!

By Erin McMullen

Here at JWI, many of us identify as devout supporters of Bachelor Nation and we’ve been watching this season of Bachelor in Paradise every Monday and Tuesday. However, we were deeply frustrated last night about Leo’s disrespectful treatment of Kendall that exhibited classic signs of gaslighting.

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What made you the woman you are today? A discussion of The Boston Girl

By Jaclyn Margolis

What made you the woman you are today? When Addie’s granddaughter poses this question, Addie leaps at the chance to share the milestones of her life. In 320 pages, we read Addie’s monologue, chronicling the story of a strong Jewish woman raised in Boston in the early twentieth century. We are immersed in childhood rebellion, family tragedy, resilient friendships, and great love.

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Outfits Speak Louder than Words

By Nancy C. Snowden

I remember clearly one conversation about attire, what to wear, what not to wear. The advice I was given was this: “Always wear a suit, you want to model what they wear; you want to be one of them.” I struggled with this because if you know even the smallest bit about my personality, a suit is the farthest thing from being representative of who I am.

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The Link Between Mass Shootings and Domestic Violence

By Steph Black

Pride is the annual round of parades and other events held this time of year everywhere from New York to Sao Paulo to Tokyo. These festive gatherings--places where LGBTQ folks can celebrate who they are and how they feel—are filled with joy and rainbows. They are also one of the few times a year LGBT people can be truly visible.

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Beyond the Parade: Intimate Partner Violence in LGBT Relationships

By Steph Black

Pride is the annual round of parades and other events held this time of year everywhere from New York to Sao Paulo to Tokyo. These festive gatherings--places where LGBTQ folks can celebrate who they are and how they feel—are filled with joy and rainbows. They are also one of the few times a year LGBT people can be truly visible.

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