WEBINAR: There’s No One I Can Trust: Rethinking Mandatory Reporting Practices

Results of a recent survey indicate mandated reporting impacts many domestic violence survivors, and most often that impact is detrimental. Half of survivors in the survey said the mandatory report made things “much worse.”

Survivors across all demographics and regions experienced harms but youth under 18 and gender variant people were especially impacted – almost half said that they had avoided seeking support for fear that they would be reported. Youth are not talking to trusted adults about their relationships because of fear of being reported. 

In this webinar, Connie Burk, Shannon Perez-Darby, and Dr. Carrie Lippy of The Northwest Network of Bi, Trans, Lesbian, and Gay Survivors of Abuse will unpack the impact of mandatory reporting on help seeking and identify practical strategies domestic violence advocates can use to decrease negative consequences of reporting and increase survivor safety and self-determination.

Monday, December 19, 2016, noon to 1:30 p.m. (EST)

Cost:

National Alliance Members: Free
Non-Members: $25


Speakers:

Connie Burk co-founded the first regional LGBT survivor services in Kansas over 20 years ago. Since 1997, she has directed The Northwest Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse in Seattle, WA. There she established the National LGBT Training & Technical Assistance Initiative and founded the National Q&A Institute. Connie is the co-author of Trauma Stewardship: An Everyday Guide to Caring for Self While Caring for Others, an executive producer of the award-winning documentary film, A Lot Like You, and a contributing author to the anthology, The Revolution Starts at Home. Her campaign, “Friends Help Friends Survive”, won a 2014 Avon Global Communications award, the first U.S. campaign to receive this honor. Connie trains internationally on community engagement, domestic abuse and prevention strategies, and taking the “crisis” out of crisis response organizations. 

Shannon Perez-Darby is the Deputy Director at The Northwest Network of Bi, Trans, Lesbian & Gay Survivors of Abuse.  Under her guidance, the NW Network has developed a regional LGBTQ youth crime victims program serving LGBTQ youth who experience dating and family violence, sexual assault, trafficking, robbery, harassment, and a host of other victimizations.  Bridging her work with youth and youth workers Shannon has developed an extensive LGBTQ youth technical assistance project focusing specifically on mandatory reporting issues, LGBTQ homeless youth, support for LGBT youth in the sex trades and LGBT youth dating violence issues.  In addition to her work with young people Shannon is a national leader on supporting organizations and communities to understand how we apply notions of accountability to our everyday lives.

Carrie Lippy, PhD is a community psychologist and independent evaluator who conducts community-based participatory research and evaluations with culturally specific domestic violence programs. She strives to use research and evaluation to promote prevention, elevate the voices and strengths of communities, and foster social change.  Prior to consulting, Carrie worked as an ORISE and CDC Foundation Fellow in the Division of Violence Prevention at CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.  During her time at CDC, Carrie collaborated on multiple projects examining evidence-based approaches to intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and suicide prevention. Before CDC, Carrie worked on numerous evaluations of culturally specific intimate partner violence programs, including an evaluation of a prevention program for immigrant and refugee communities funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Carrie currently serves as the Research Coordinator of the National LGBTQ Domestic Violence Institute. After 9 years in Atlanta, Carrie moved to Seattle last year where she now lives with her partner, two dogs, and two surprisingly destructive turtles.